Last edited by Samule
Tuesday, December 1, 2020 | History

6 edition of Medicine and Slavery found in the catalog.

Medicine and Slavery

The Diseases and Health Care of Blacks in Antebellum Virginia (Blacks in the New World)

by Todd L. Savitt

  • 3 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by University of Illinois Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Black studies,
  • Blacks In The U.S.,
  • History Of Medicine,
  • History - U.S.,
  • History: American,
  • USA,
  • Public Policy - Social Services & Welfare,
  • Slavery,
  • United States - Antebellum Era,
  • History / United States / 19th Century,
  • United States - 19th Century,
  • 19th century,
  • African Americans,
  • Diseases,
  • History,
  • Medicine,
  • Slaves,
  • Social conditions,
  • Virginia

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages352
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9428478M
    ISBN 10025200874X
    ISBN 109780252008740


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Medicine and Slavery by Todd L. Savitt Download PDF EPUB FB2

In Medicine and Slavery, Todd L. Savitt evaluates the diet, hygiene, clothing, and living and working conditions of antebellum African Americans, slave and free, and analyzes the diseases and health conditions that afflicted them in urban areas, at industrial sites, and on by:   In Medicine and Slavery, Todd L.

Savitt evaluates the diet, hygiene, clothing, and living and working conditions of Widely regarded as the most comprehensive study of its kind, this volume offers valuable insight into the alleged medical differences between whites and blacks that translated as racial inferiority and were used Medicine and Slavery book justify slavery and discrimination/5.

In Medicine and Slavery, Todd L. Savitt evaluates the diet, hygiene, clothing, and living and working conditions of antebellum African Americans, slave 3/5(1). Medicine and slavery: the diseases and health care of Blacks in antebellum Virginia3/5(1).

Book reviews: Medicine and Slavery: the diseases and health care of blacks in antebellum Virginia By TODD L. SAVITT (Urbana, University of Illinois Medicine and Slavery book, ).

pages Lesley Doyal Race & Class 3, Author: Lesley Doyal. AFRICAN AMERICAN SLAVE MEDICINE. COVEY. HISTORY † AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES “African American Slave Medicine by Herbert C.

Covey is a concise and cogent treatment of the enslavement of African people and of herbal pharmacopoeia in the United States. Birthing a Slave is the first book to focus exclusively on the health care of enslaved women, and it argues convincingly for the critical role of reproductive medicine in the slave system of antebellum by:   Medical Book Medicine and Slavery In "Medicine and Slavery", Todd L.

Savitt evaluates the diet, hygiene, clothing, and living and working conditions of antebellum African Americans, slave and free, and analyzes the diseases and health conditions that afflicted them in urban areas, at industrial sites, and on plantations'.

American medicine was built on the backs of slaves. And it still affects how doctors treat patients today. Doctors must grapple with this racist history to improve our medical : Kathleen Bachynski. Did Slavery Create Modern Medicine. My new book looks at the ways contemporary medical knowledge arose from slavery and was paid for in the lives of slaves.

Medicine and Slavery by Todd L. Savitt,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(20). Slave medicine. By Maisah B. Robinson, Ph.D., and Frank H. Robinson Sr., M.D. Richard Toler, ageremembered that slaveowners cared for their slaves in the same way they cared for their livestock.

So, when slaves fell ill, they often treated themselves using remedies made from boneset, sage, and other herbs. This edited collection considers questions of slave health and medical care from a regional perspective.

Contains thematic essays on a wide range of topics, such as “Civil War Medicine,” “Folk Medicine,” “Racialized Medicine,” “Slavery and Medicine,” and “Slaves in Medical Education and Research.”.

"Medicine and Slavery will be necessary reading for all scholars dealing with black Medicine and Slavery book and the antebellum south, as well as those concerned with the history of medicine and medical thought."--Journal of American History "Judicious, interesting, well-organized and clearly written, this book sets a standard for black minority medical history." African American Slave Medicine of the 19th Century COLIN FITZGERALD century were equally as effective in treating ailments of the body when compared to commonly practiced white medicine of the same time era; and, in some cases, medicine practiced by slaves was more effective in treating the physical and psychological conditions ofAuthor: Colin Fitzgerald.

Scholarship on slave medicine emphasizes that the professional doctor's central role was to assist planters in "slave management" (7). As an early study of slavery in Alabama asserted, the slave owner's vigilance about his slaves' health was driven by "prudence and human ity." A slave who became ill "meant loss of working time; death, an.

This study re-evaluates the field known as Negro/Slave Medicine, which has traditionally focused on the efforts of slaveowners to provide medical care for their slaves, addressing the slaves' proactive management of medical care; brutality as a cause of the constant need for medical attention; and the health risks posed by arduous agricultural by: “Few scholars have the necessary language skills to explore sugar slavery in the Danish and Dutch West Indies.

In For the Health of the Enslaved: Slaves, medicine and power in the Danish West Indies,Niklas Thode Jensen offers us a rare opportunity to learn about aspects of sugar planting and its impact on the enslaved in St. Croix, the primary sugar island in the. It has been nearly twenty-five years since the initial publication of Todd Savitt's monograph Medicine and Slavery.

The product of Savitt's dissertation on black health care in the antebellum South, Medicine and Slavery came out at a time when historians were setting their analytical sights on what Kenneth Stampp had dubbed the South's "peculiar institution.".

Plantation Medicine and Health Care in the Old South Medical care in the Old South was provided by a variety of people by a variety of means. Physicians were few and far between, and their range of care was dependent upon their professional training.

Due to the shortage of physicians and the distance that. The history of medicine bristles with attempts to find new and miraculous remedies, to work with and against nature to restore humans to health and well-being.

In this book, Londa Schiebinger examines medicine and human experimentation in the Atlantic World, exploring the circulation of people, disease, plants, and knowledge between Europe, Africa. The legacy of slavery was the focus at the Slavery & Public Health: Past, Present, and Future symposium, held May 5, at Harvard T.H.

Chan School of Public Health. The event grew out of efforts by Harvard University to uncover its links to slavery. African American Slave Medicine by Herbert C. Covey is a concise and cogent treatment of the enslavement of African people and herbal pharmacopoeia in the United States.

The text makes an important contribution to the expanding field of slavery and medicine, covering the areas of American history, African American Studies, and the history of Brand: Lexington Books.

In Medicine and Slavery, Todd L. Savitt evaluates the diet, hygiene, clothing, and living and working conditions of antebellum African Americans, slave and free, and analyzes the diseases and health conditions that afflicted them in urban areas, at industrial sites, and on plantations/5(6).

This book depicts competing approaches to reproductive health on plantations in the antebellum South, as black women and white men sought to enhance the health of enslaved mothers. The first book to focus solely on the health care of enslaved women, it argues for the critical role of reproductive medicine in the slave system of antebellum America.

Medicine and Slavery: The Diseases and Health Care of Blacks in Antebellum Virginia (Blacks in the New World) by Todd Lee Savitt, Todd L. Savitt and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences () It has been nearly twenty-five years since the initial publication of Todd Savitt's monograph Medicine and Slavery.

Accept. We use cookies to improve your website experience. To learn about our use of cookies and how you can manage your cookie settings, please see our Cookie Policy. By closing this message, you are consenting to our use of cookies.

My new book, “Secret Cures of Slaves: People, Plants, and Medicine in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic,” zeroes in on human experimentation on Caribbean slave plantations in the late s. Slavery and Medicine. DOI link for Slavery and Medicine.

DOI link for Slavery and Medicine. Slavery and Medicine book. Enslavement and Medical Practices in Antebellum Louisiana. By Katherine Bankole.

Edition 1st Edition. First Published eBook Published 30 July Pub. location New York. Imprint Routledge. DOI Sex, Sickness, and Slavery. Illness in the Antebellum South. How white Southern doctors used science to defend slavery.

Marli F. Weiner skillfully integrates the history of medicine with social and intellectual history in this study of how race and sex complicated medical treatment in the antebellum South.

The medicine used by slave healers was also different from that of white doctors, as illustrated by Polly Shine's emphasis on natural remedies. Slave healers possessed special knowledge of herbs and roots that some believed was passed down and others believed was inborn.

DECADES OUT OF SLAVERY, JULIA BROWN EXPLAINED TO GENEVA TONSILL, an African American Works Progress Administration (WPA) interviewer, how her former owner practiced medicine on his slaves.¹ Brown recounted, “He’d try one medicine and if it didn’t do no good he’d try another until it did do good.”² Brown’s account illustrates the risky and experimental nature.

In her new book, Stanford historian Londa Schiebinger examines the development of medical knowledge and experiments conducted on slaves in British and French colonies between the s and early. Discover librarian-selected research resources on Women in 19th-Century America from the Questia online library, including full-text online books, academic journals, magazines, newspapers and more.

One of the most important events in 19th century America was the nationwide abolishment of slavery after the American Civil War ( – ). --Health and the slave quarters --Clothing, food, and working conditions --Other health problems and conditions --White and Black medicine --Care of urban and industrial slaves, the aged, and free Blacks --Epidemics --Insanity --Blacks as medical specimens --Afterword: medicine, slavery, and the historian.

In a provocative new book, 1 George Beauchamp, MD, claims that physicians are “slaves to medicine.” He explains that this is partly because “when most people go to see a doctor, both the services the doctor provides and the fees that insurance companies allow him to charge are largely predetermined by parties other than the patients and doctors.”Author: David B.

Nash. Birthing a Slave gives us a ground-level view of medicine, gender, and doctor-patient relationships under the slave system in the U.S. South. Deeply researched and engagingly written, Schwartz's book is sure to become not only an essential work in our understanding of health care in the antebellum South, but also of the wider society that Author: Marie Jenkins Schwartz.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

My book, Christian Slavery: Conversion and Race in the Protestant Atlantic World, shows that religion was fundamental to the development of both slavery and race in the Protestant Atlantic world. Slave owners in the Caribbean and elsewhere established governments and legal codes based on an ideology of “Protestant Supremacy,” which excluded the majority of enslaved.

African-American Slave Medicine offers a critical examination of how African-American slaves medical needs were addressed during the years before and surrounding the Civil War. Drawing upon ex-slave interviews conducted during the s and s by the Works Project Administration (WPA), Dr.

Herbert C. Covey inventories many of the herbal %().Domestic slavery and sometimes concubine slavery appeared among the nomadic Arabs, among Native Americans primarily devoted to hunting, and among the seafaring Vikings.

Some ascribe the beginnings of slavery to war and the consequent subjection of one group by another.Samuel Adolphus Cartwright (November 3, – May 2, ) was a physician who practiced in Mississippi and Louisiana in the antebellum United States.

Cartwright is best known as the inventor of the 'mental illness' of drapetomania, the desire of a slave for freedom, and an outspoken critic of germ theory. During the American Civil War he joined the Confederate Born: Samuel Adolphus Cartwright, November .